Claire Ashmore

Author

The Boy Who Could See Only Purple That’s Right!

I am proud to announce that the second edition of my book complete with a new ending has been published through my publishing company, Sea Green Ink Publishing Ltd. Heartfelt thanks again to Kat Quin for her superb illustrations.

Mary Sutherland (Tulip Design, Cambridge NZ) was responsible for getting the first 30 copies to print for this edition to be published just before Christmas, 2021. Acknowledging Mary’s brilliant skills and knowledge.

Thank you also to Steve Snyder in Montana, USA, who collaborated in creating the new ending where Milton becomes resourced, not only for himself now, but also enough to share with others. Milton’s good friend, Flo, invites him to skate to the rainbow for even more colours.

It has an uplifting, hopeful ending. Yet it is not the end – it is just the beginning!

Many thanks also to Dr. Roxanna Erickson Klein who not only gave permission for me to use the name Milton in the story but also wrote the blurb on the back cover and a beautiful review. Simply a story of encouragement, this book was inspired by the life and works of Milton H. Erickson MD who is Dr. Erickson Klein’s father.

When I first heard that Dr. Milton Erickson had a form of colour blindness , I was curious about how he would have seen and experienced the world. I am in awe of how he responded to his own life challenges and grateful that he shared his learning with the world.

We each have our own challenges, and this story encourages us to find ways to discern and discover who we really are while giving ourselves the gift of time to remember how far we have already come. We can then choose to grow; growing means changing. Change can start from one simple thought. 

The definition of the concept of ‘Change’ as created by Ronald D. Davis, author of the Gift of Dyslexia, is included in the glossary. I acknowledge and thank Ronald D. Davis and Davis Dyslexia Association International (DDAI) for granting me permission. 

The new edition is soon to be available for online sales but for now, please email Claire at claire.ashmore@xtra.co.nz to purchase a copy $28 (inc GST) plus postage. Or pick-up and have a cup of tea here and we can read the story together. This is what the book is about and it is ready to read and enjoy:

Milton’s gift is purple. He loves purple in streams, on fishy fins, in trees, sunsets, rainbows and violets. This delightful story shows how Milton develops his awareness of the gift he comes to love and the feelings he experiences in the process. When winter steps in and Milton loses sight of his beloved purple, he goes through a dark night of the soul.

One quiet afternoon, he sets about bringing purple back into his life. With a little inspiration from his good friend, Flo, and acting on a thought, Milton finds purple again and makes it his own happy strength. He is even happy to share it now. Milton begins to feel confident for more change to grow even more colours.

Adults, as well as children, will love reading Milton’s journey with purple and will meet Milton’s friend, Flo, who has her own story in another upcoming book: ‘Basket of Light’. Parents can use Milton’s story to help their sons and daughters talk about feelings related to learning and prompt their children to grow and strengthen what is already good inside. Children are sure to be inspired by this story written by Claire Ashmore, and will delight in the illustrations created by Kat Quin, who has drawn inspiration from the world around her to bring Milton’s story to life.

Claire Ashmore Author|
Claire Ashmore Author|

About the Author

Claire Ashmore is an educator and literacy advocate. Claire works in strength-based ways with children and adults along with whānau or their family. She firmly believes that a large part of being happy is knowing we do have potential to grow our own strengths.

A strength may start off as small as a small seed, but a few clear thoughts applied with love and encouragement can nurture our strengths to grow  and bloom. 

This family has kindly given permission to share their photo of Dad, Steve, reading to Alex and Sam reminding them to remember their ‘purple’

Excerpt from the REVIEW

Reviewed by Dr Roxanna Erickson Klein

This publication is the first in which the New Zealand team of author and artist have worked together; hopefully the first of many. Author, Claire Ashmore, is an educator with a background in vocational, grassroots and embedded literacy research and development. Her work as an elementary school teacher and later in English as a second language has developed her strength of presenting complex ideas in a straightforward manner. She describes this work as a resource for parents, teachers and therapists in support of helping children lead safe, peaceful and productive lives. When asked about future possibilities, Ashmore described ideas still on the drawing board– future children’s stories with equally important messages.

The Boy Who Could See Only Purple. That’s Right!

By Claire Ashmore
 Illustrated by Kat Quin

Reviewed by Dr Roxanna Erickson Klein

It was immediately apparent to me that this charming tale was inspired by my dad, Milton H. Erickson MD. The author, who had been introduced to Erickson’s work through NLP training, confirmed this. Known for his creative approaches to mobilize unconscious resources, Erickson’s ideas fostered a change in the way professional psychotherapy is practiced. His work laid a foundation for the value of nurturing curiosity, self-acceptance and internal search coupled with unspoken suggestion. Decades after his death, Erickson’s work continues to influence a broad variety of positive, growth-oriented therapeutic directions. This story shows harmony of this process as joy of discovery transitions into healthy adaptive opportunities for ongoing exploration. That’s right, is it not?

This publication is the first in which the New Zealand team of author and artist have worked together; hopefully the first of many. Author, Claire Ashmore, is an educator with a background in vocational, grassroots and embedded literacy research and development. Her work as an elementary school teacher and later in English as a second language has developed her strength of presenting complex ideas in a straightforward manner. She describes this work as a resource for parents, teachers and therapists in support of helping children lead safe, peaceful and productive lives. When asked about future possibilities, Ashmore described ideas still on the drawing board– future children’s stories with equally important messages.

The artist with whom Ashmore partnered is Katherine Q. Merewether. Starting with Ashmore’s initial rough sketches, Merewether brought the story to life with line drawings that flow through the book matching the lightness of the text. The style is distinctly different from her previous publications as an illustrator of children’s stories. Throughout, the story’s economy of words is mirrored with deceptively simple illustrations.

A fanciful storyline illustrates the limitations each of us hold within, while illustrations draw out internal imagery to blend with images on the pages. Beautifully done line drawings punctuated with subtle washes of color show how limitations can alter perceptions. In a gentle way, the work shows how habitual patterns express themselves, and then models possibilities for growth beyond. The discrete transition into ongoing growth invites the reader, in unspoken words, to self-reflect and explore his or her own habitual margins. The direction of expectation, engagement, exploration and discovery become a pathway. Enrichment by sensory exploration generates new possibilities and appreciation for beauty of every day surroundings. It is all part of the story and of life itself.

The Boy Who Could See Only Purple, That’s Right! is an engaging story that exemplifies the unique artistry of Milton Erickson’s approaches. Dad would have found great pleasure in the imaginative way this tale welcomes the reader into the story with simp le words complemented by line drawings. The tale unfolds into a beautiful metaphor of the emergent process of self-awareness and discovery. Pleasant depth is revealed through the stillness of uncomplicated simplicity.

(From the Milton H. Erickson Foundation Newsletter Vol 31, #3)

Milton reminds us to open our eyes and alert our ears; the story invites us to listen to the wind, to feel life and feel connected

Professional services described as Davis™, including Davis Dyslexia Correction®, Davis™ Symbol Mastery, Davis™ Orientation Counseling,  Davis™ Attention Mastery,  Davis™ Math Mastery, and Davis™ Reading Program for Young Learners may only be provided by persons who are trained and licensed as Davis Facilitators or Specialists by Davis Dyslexia Association International.

Licensed and certified by Davis Dyslexia Association International